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Bullseye Camera Systems LLC – check your hits wirelessly

This is an interesting product for those who spend a lot of time at the range, especially shooting at distance. Bullseye Camera Systems are the manufacturers of this portable camera system for everyday range use. It captured our attention partially due to its price and capabilities. Essentially this thing allows you to check your hits with a wireless remote camera – you can view your previous shots from up to 1 mile away using your phone, tablet or laptop.

No walking back and forth or peering through binoculars.

The company offers two models, a 500 yd unit and a 1,000 yd unit. Apparently the 1,000 yd model has been used out to 1790 yds with a clear line of sight. However, if you need to shoot 1 mile or more, you should purchase their YAGI antenna upgrade which extends the 1,000 yd model all the way out to 3 grand.

That seems like a pretty good capability considering the size, weight and cost of this portable kit (though we have not yet actually used one). With a 4-6 hour run time for the camera’s battery pack, you’ll save a lot of time walking down range after every shot to check every shot. For guys that like to precisely measure shot groups for hand loads, this alone will be worth the money for time it saves. As many readers are aware, you often have a a fixed firing line that’s bermed to protect the “pits. Traditionally half the shooters pull and mark targets for those on the firing line, and then switch out for their own turn. This puts people down range plodding back and forth, which is at least time consuming and at worst dangerous.

The Bullseye Camera System keeps all shooters up range and is usable for more than just long range shooting (seems like it would be perfect for someone who has mobility limitations). For roughly the price of an entry level, quality spotting scope you can pick up this camera and pretty much use it however you want. One of the advantages the system has over a spotting scope is the lack of mirage distortion. On hot days the heat waves rising from the ground will restrict your ability to accurately view your point of impact. Since the camera is typically set up 4 to 8 ft back and diagonal to the target, mirage will be substantially mitigated.

The first thing many people will think when first checking out the Bullseye is,  it’s only a matter of time until someone shoots it. However, by placing the camera 30-45 degrees to the side you will significantly reduce this risk, as well as noting the direction of cross wind when initially setting it up. Of course that doesn’t mean it wouldn’t be a bad idea to place some sandbags up range to protect it, or maybe just place a steel silhouette target in front to act as a shield. If you are the kind of person that lacks foresight (or just one who suffers bad luck when it comes to equipment), Bullseye Camera Systems offers a two year extended warranty “down range protection plan” which protects you from negligently shooting your own camera. This might be worth the cost, since there are definitely some assholes who would shoot for the camera.

One of the features that set this system apart from other similar cameras is the software that comes with it. After each shot, you will be shown the location of your last shot, regardless of how many holes are on the paper. In addition, you can log data as you shoot. This will allow you to review and analyze your shot groups, etc. at your leisure. The system doesn’t use cell towers, so you can set it up in the middle of dead-zone nowhere and still enjoy a crisp picture.  Overall, the Bullseye Camera system seems at first glance to be full of useful features for the serious shooter. The basic 500yd model is listed at $449 MSRP or $549 MRSP for the basic 1,000yd model.  Check it out at http://www.bullseyecamera.com/.

Picture courtesy of Outfitter Marketing.