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SilencerCo cracks the code with a production shotgun suppressor

You have seen it in movies, read about it in books and witnessed people attempt to build what was seemingly impossible – the production shotgun silencer.  There are many who have attempted to build a sound suppressor for “scatterguns” in the past, with varying degrees of success. Previously no one has been able to successfully bring a production shotgun sound suppressor to market, despite the fact that the shotgun is one of the most commonly owned firearms in America.

That has now changed forever. Utah based SilencerCo has finally solved the unsolvable puzzle with the Salvo 12.

Yes, there have been shotgun suppressors before. The Salvo 12, however, is clearly (as SilencerCo avers) a commercially viable shotgun suppressor. It attaches to both pump and semi automatic 12 gauge shotguns via a removable choke system. The same threads that are used for traditional chokes accept a protruding adapter for which the silencer can screw onto.  With a rectangular shape reminiscent of the company’s Osprey pistol suppressor line, the Salvo 12 is threaded on tight and then indexed below the shooters line of sight. This allows the factory bead or sights to be used properly. On an 18” barreled Remington 870, the Salvo 12 reduces the decibels from 159.8 dB at the muzzle, to 137.9 db!  That means the shooter will receive 132 db at their ear using the full 12” long silencer.

SilencerCo cracks the code with a production shotgun suppressor photo

The Salvo 12 is constructed out of 17-4 stainless steel and 7075 Aluminum. This keeps the weight down to just 34.5 ounces. If that’s too long, or two heavy for the shooters application, you can remove several “layers” of the can, to achieve an ideal configuration. The ATF has cleared this unique design, allowing the shooter to incrementally reduce the suppressor in size from 12”, though you are increasing the level of noise as you do so. Think of it as removing several baffles from a .22 sound suppressor (which you can do to clean it). You are not breaking the law by removing baffles, and you are not in the wrong if you were to shoot the reassembled .22 can without replacing all of the removed baffles. It might not be good for the silencer, but it’s not unlawful.

The kit will allow to custom tailor your Salvo 12 from the full 12”, down to 10” (134.1 dB at the ear) or further to 8” which will bring result in a perceived 137 dB.  Shortening the Salvo 12 to the minimum 6” OAL will still provide some hearing protection, with a reading of 155.9 dB at the ear. Watch the video below for further explanation.

“Every year, millions of sportsmen and women venture into the field to hunt. While advances in technology have spurred a record-breaking proliferation of rifle and handgun suppressors, shotgun owners have been without a real solution for sound protection. Some choose hearing protection in the form of earmuffs or plugs for relief in controlled environments, but most spurn their use in the field or in a home protection scenario, where the ability to detect other sounds is critical. “ the company says. It is their hope to bridge the gap that exists in the shooting community, from the more commonly suppressed black rifles, and into the realm of common, traditional sporting arms.”  SilencerCo

SilencerCo cracks the code with a production shotgun suppressor photo

Says Joshua Waldron, SilencerCo’s CEO,

“The Salvo 12 represents a revolution in silencers, not just an evolution. There is a huge installed base of shotgun hunters and shooters that has been waiting for a product like this for a long time, and we are proud to deliver it.”

That’s no joke. We recently had the chance to shoot several Salvo 12 equipped shotguns on a range day hosted for the product’s launch. From Benelli M4 shotguns and Mossberg 500 pumps as carried by our military to common hunting guns like FNH, Browning and Weatherbys found in duck blinds and skeet matches, all were amazingly quiet. The Salvo 12 will handle both shot and slug.

I personally perceived the audible noise made by the firing weapon, regardless of model, to sound very similar to a suppressed .22LR pistol.

A suppressed .22LR pistol.

SilencerCo cracks the code with a production shotgun suppressor photo

The added gain of the Salvo is a reduction of felt recoil, resulting in the ability to more quickly reengage missed targets. This will be an immense help to youthful shooters and those having trouble managing a full size 12 gauge. The recoil was comparable to a 28 gauge, in my opinion.

“SilencerCo’s introduction of a commercially viable shotgun suppressor will introduce a new segment of the shooting public to the advantages of firearms suppressors. Forward thinking like this will help ASA and the industry transition suppressors from NFA items to the mainstream.” Knox Williams, American Suppressor Association

Shooting the shotguns was proof enough. The Salvo 12 is undoubtedly going to make a big splash in all the shotgun sports and will likewise play a role in the many uses of what is already an extremely versatile weapon. At an MRSP of $1,400 its comparable in price to many center fire rifle cans, and it easily attached to any shotgun set up for a removable choke. Look for it on the shelves this fall, and check back with us for a full report of this groundbreaking development in silencer history.

Post your questions in the comment section and we’ll try to get them answered. SilencerCo cracks the code with a production shotgun suppressor photo