The Ultimate Firearms Destination for the Gun Lifestyle

Human Factor Research Group’s SAVE Tourniquet

There is a new piece of medical kit available for those who with to be prepared for exigent events and trauma. Good for a range bag (which should always have trauma gear in it), the vehicle, EDC or even the home, the SAVE TOURNIQUET was developed by the Human Factor Research Group (HFRG) with an internist and a trauma surgeon. The goal was to produce an intuitive TQ (tourniquet) someone can apply under extreme stress, whether the victim or someone attempting to render aid. They did this, says the HFRG, by providing speed, control and target compression without complexity utilizing the push, turn and pull movements ingrained in all of us.

Constructed in the USA of a ballistic nylon strap, buckle, pressure ridge and reel, the SAVE TQ can be used quickly and single-handedly target and focus compression and occlude blood flow. It is engineered to attain femoral artery occlusion (i.e. stop the bleeding) in 2.1 seconds.

From the website, comparing the SAVE to a windlass style TQ:

…a patient experiencing a Class 3 Hemorrhage injury will sustain a pulse rate exceeding 120 BPM. Under these conditions, the patient will be losing approximately 1.2 liter of blood per minute – or – .2 liters every 10 seconds. Hemorrhaging at this pace will result in:
• Class 2 Shock occurs after 40 seconds of blood loss.
• Class 3 shock occurs after 80 seconds of blood loss.
• After 90 seconds of a Class 3 Hemorrhage, the patient will begin to lose fine motor control and the ability to process complex decisions.
At. 2.1 seconds to attain femoral artery occlusion, the SAVE Tourniquet requires 1/10th the time to apply under the stress of patient care….

Learn more about the SAVE Tourniquet or purchase yours here. They retail between $40 and $50, with special pricing for packages and quanity.

The Human Factor Research Group is an organization that publishes, teaches and trains its students on a number of topics, including defensive tactics, the psychology of survival, the impact of stress on the performance of first responders, the kinesthetics and ergonomics of shooting and fighting stances, leadership and many other disciplines.