The Ultimate Firearms Destination for the Gun Lifestyle

SHOOTING GLASSES BUYER'S GUIDE

Considering what it protects and the catastrophic damage it can prevent, eye pro is mandatory. End of story. With so many shooting glasses out there, RECOIL tested some recent offerings available on the market to determine which models offer the most value for $125 or less.

Please note that we listed the highest safety certification each product has received in the United States. Generally speaking, if a pair of eye pro has received a Mil-spec rating, it'll also meet (and exceed) ANSI optics and impact standards (and sometimes European requirements, as well).

Read on to see if there's shooting glasses that meet your needs.

  • Raid Eyewear
    5.11 Tactical
    Raid Eyewear eyeshield ANSI Z87.1-2003 clear, orange, smoke 100 percent $110 511tactical.com
    Pros:
    This eyeshield might look familiar because it's designed by Wiley X, so it comes with reliable engineering and functionality. It comes in a kit with various goodies, including three lenses that provide excellent peripheral vision with their wide coverage. The frame and temple arms are flexible.

    Cons:
    The nose pads are a bit stiff. Also, there's almost no way to insert a lens in without getting our grubby fingerprints all over it. On a related note, we envision wear points where the lens and frame meet, as there are already signs of rubbing on the lens edge and frame after our short-term testing.
  • Buckmark Shooting Glasses
    Browning
    Buckmark Shooting Glasses eyeshield ANSI Z87.1-2010 smoke 99 percent $30 browning.com
    Pros:
    For the cost of only a 50-round box of 9mm, this eyeshield offers surprisingly solid performance. Peripheral vision through the wraparound, suspended lens is clear and undistorted while the temple arms are flexible and soft. The best feature? The non-slip nose pads can be adjusted to three positions. The Buckmark is a good buy if budget is a concern.

    Cons:
    The lens doesn't extend all the way down to our tester's cheek, so a slit of light always seeps upward. On top of this, the lens filters only 99 percent of UV rays; others in its class offer full 100-percent capability.
  • Claymaster Shooting Glasses
    Browning
    Claymaster Shooting Glasses eyeshield ANSI Z87.1-2010 blue, clear, orange, smoke, yellow 99 percent $59 browning.com
    Pros:
    For just $59, the Claymaster gives you the most customization among the bunch. The temple arms can extend for increased temple length and ratchet up or down for pitch adjustment. The nose pads slide up and down for height adjustment and, by virtue of being quite soft, can conform to various nose bridges. And the kit comes with a whopping five lenses.

    Cons:
    Light can seep upwards because the lenses don't sit all the way down to our tester's cheeks. Also, they don't provide full 100-percent protection against UV rays.
  • 5B
    ESS
    5B sunglasses U.S. Mil-spec PRF-31013 mirrored gray 100-percent UVA and UVB $100 esseyepro.com
    Pros:
    The ballistic high-impact lenses deliver serious protection with crisp, distortion-free vision — and the fact that they're mirrored adds to their badass aesthetic. The frames are fashionable and lightweight. The temple arms stay open unless you apply a bit more pressure to the hinge, ensuring the arms won't collapse once you take off the eyewear.

    Cons:
    The frame feels stiff. The tips of the arms cant upward when we wear them, which can affect our hat and ear pro at times. There isn't full lens coverage around your eye area.
  • CDI
    ESS
    CDI sunglasses U.S. Mil-spec PRF-31013 smoke and clear 100-percent UVA and UVB $100 esseyepro.com
    Pros:
    The CDI features ESS's Lateral Exchange System, which lets you swap out the lenses depending on your environment's available lighting. The non-slip rubber on the molded nosepieces and temple sleeves ensures a comfortable, secure fit. And a retention strap can be attached to the tips of the temple arms.

    Cons:
    Unless you're wearing gloves, there's no way around getting your fingerprints on the lenses as you remove and insert them. Plus, because they're sunglasses, there isn't full lens coverage around your eye area.
  • CDI Max
    ESS
    CDI Max sunglasses U.S. Mil-spec PRF-31013 smoke and clear 100-percent UVA and UVB $100 esseyepro.com
    Pros:
    The CDI Max offers generous lens wrap for more eye coverage and ESS's patented Lateral Exchange System so you can quickly swap out different colored lenses. It's a great combination of maximum protection on the range and fashionable functionality for everyday use. The kit also comes with clear lenses, a microfiber cleaning pouch, and a hard case.

    Cons:
    There's no way of exchanging the lenses without smearing your fingerprints all over without using gloves, the micro-fiber cleaning pouch, or something similar.
  • Crossbow 2X Kit
    ESS
    Crossbow 2X Kit eyeshield U.S. Mil-spec PRF-31013 clear, smoke 100-percent UVA and UVB $105 esseyepro.com
    Pros:
    Outstanding shooting glasses. It's so comfortable we forgot that we were wearing any eye pro at all after a few minutes. The anti-fog lenses also provide hardcore protection and a clear field of view without any distortion. Also, the Crossbow is part of ESS's Cross Series, letting you swap out lenses, components, and accessories with the other two eyeshields in this lineup. This kit comes with various accessories, including a clear lens and hard case. If that weren't enough, you can also order prescription lens inserts separately.

    Cons:
    It's hard to find fault with this eyeshield, other than the fact that it falls on the pricier end of the scale.
  • Crossbow Suppressor 2X Kit
    ESS
    Crossbow Suppressor 2X Kit eyeshield U.S. Mil-spec PRF-31013 clear and copper 100-percent UVA and UVB $110 esseyepro.com
    Pros:
    This stellar eyeshield features temple arms that are wafer thin to accommodate ear-cup hearing protection and communication devices, eliminating pressure points on your temples. The lenses are superb. Plus, you can exchange the lenses and components from any eyewear in ESS's Cross Series, increasing variety depending on your needs. This kit comes with various accessories, including a clear lens and hard case. If that weren't enough, you can also order prescription lens inserts separately.

    Cons:
    There's not much about this top-quality eye pro to complain about, though we suppose the price is nothing to laugh at.
  • SI Fuel Cell With Cerakote
    Oakley
    SI Fuel Cell With Cerakote sunglasses ANSI Z87.1-2003 gray 100-percent UVA, UVB, and UVC $130 oakley.com
    Pros:
    The already durable frame has been painted and cured with Cerakote Generation II Firearm Coatings to increase toughness. The Plutonite lenses have superior UV filtration while meeting the ANSI Z87 basic impact standards. A good mix of looks, protection, and everyday use.

    Cons:
    At $130, this is the biggest greenback guzzler of the bunch. And if it truly wanted to be one tough mother, the lenses should have been Mil-spec.
  • SI Fives Squared
    Oakley
    SI Fives Squared sunglasses ANSI Z87.1-2003 gray 100-percent UVA, UVB, and UVC $80 oakley.com
    Pros:
    A good-looking pair of shades that provides crisp optics and decent protection in a lightweight package. The temple arms taper so there's coverage around the eye socket, but get slimmer around the ears. This pair is ideal for those with small to medium faces.

    Cons:
    Those with big noggins will find this a tight squeeze. This is great for everyday use and the occasional trip to an outdoor range, but not necessarily for hardcore use.
Page 2 of 3 1 2 3 Next ยป