The Ultimate Firearms Destination for the Gun Lifestyle

Attention nerds in Utah

Note – I do not use the term nerd as a pejorative. I like to get my dork on with the best of them.

To the point: writer Larry Correia, gozillion-copy selling anti-gun-lib-schooling, pro-Second Amendment proselytizing author of the internationally renowned science-fiction/supernatural series Monster Hunters International is going to be running a couple of RPG sessions in Utah to raise money for charity. That’s RPG as in Role Playing Game, not as in the ones so often shot as us by assholes in dusty, unfriendly places.  It will be a 24 hour gaming session apparently set up at the behest of Dungeon Crawlers Radio to help Junior Achievement. Correia’s game (there will be others) will be using the Iron Kingdom rule set, from Privateer Press.

If you haven’t read Monster Hunters International or any of its sequels, you should check it out (the protagonist rocks a Saiga named The Abomination).

Attention nerds in Utah photo

Note: the minis in the featured image are pre-gen characters that will be available to play. They are, back to front and left to right: BA, Zyva, Chuck Finley, Buster. Middle, Fyona, Loph, Tom, Barnabus. Front, Old Spice, Wolowitz and Burt. You can read the details and learn how to be a part of it here on Monster Hunter Nation.

Read his op-ed on gun control from December 20, 2012 (the date is important) here. You’ll be glad you did.

Attention nerds in Utah photo

Below is an excerpt from MHI. Once again, to get in on the gaming this weekend, get details from Monster Hunter Nation.

I gently picked up the massive weapon. It was short, but it was thick, and it had to weigh close to twelve pounds, and that was while it was empty. Add almost a box of shells and a grenade and it would be even more so. I worked the action. The bolt was slick and the spring was powerful. Milo had thoughtfully added a shelf to the safety so that it could be operated with the trigger finger. It pointed better than it looked when I snapped it into position.

“What about specialty munitions?”

“There is a gas regulator at the end of the hand guard. I machined a new one so that this one now has three positions. One is regular, works for all of the full power stuff. Two opens the port, and I’ve got it calibrated to work with the gas rounds and the mini grenades. Three is closed, turns it into a manually operated bolt action, for the low powered stuff like the bean-bags and the integrally suppressed shells. I’ve tried it with all of them. If you have the regulator in the right spot for the right ammo, it isn’t going to malfunction.” I ran my finger along the regulator, and found detents for the different power levels. There was also a mystery button. When I pushed it a hinge unlocked, and an eight-inch, heavy-duty bayonet was released. The blade was absurdly long and thick. With a flick of the muzzle it locked into place with a snap. It was not the world’s best-balanced spear, but I wouldn’t want to be on the receiving end of it.

“No freaking way. That is awesome.”

I got the idea off of Czech CZ52, but I improved it. It folds to the side, out of the way of the grenade launcher. You don’t hardly even know it’s there until you need it. Bottom edge is good cutting steel, on the top edge is a silver inlay. You stick this in a lycanthrope and it is going to know it. I had a friend of mine who makes custom knives do it for me.”