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Preview – SHTF – Snow Way Out

The Sun’s Setting, You’re Stranded Above the Snow Line, and the Temperature’s About to Drop to Dangerous Levels. Time to Start Digging…

When traveling in the backcountry during winter conditions, the risk always looms of a problem that can plunge you into a survival situation. Even when using a vehicle, something could happen that may cause you to have to spend the night without protection from the weather.

Consider this: It’s late afternoon, snow is falling, and more is expected for several hours. Visibility is already poor and it’s starting to get dark. An accident causes an engine fire that quickly spreads to the rest of your vehicle, destroying it completely. Or, you’re traveling on foot and have become lost in the same conditions. Are you prepared? Could you spend the night? What you brought with you — and the preparations made beforehand — could save your life.

Preview   SHTF   Snow Way Out photo Preview   SHTF   Snow Way Out photo

In cold/wet weather, your greatest threat is from hypothermia, the lowering of your body’s core temperature. Having a shelter helps prevent your body from losing heat by protecting you from moisture, as well as controlling the speed and temperature of the air around you. This article will offer some basic instructions on how to build shelters using snow and other natural materials that may be available. Having some tools and supplies will make building them much easier. At a minimum, you should carry a shovel when traveling in winter. A saw, foam ground pad, and tarps are also very useful. What you build will depend on your preparations and resources.

Snow Trench
This is a simple but solid winter shelter that can be made even in powder snow. When finished, you’ll end up with an enclosed space with walls made of snow and a roof made of evergreen branches (or a tarp if you have one).

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