The Ultimate Firearms Destination for the Gun Lifestyle

Saturday Night Blade Porn: 3D Printed replica of a replica: Roman Empire Sword

The National Museum of Art in Norway decided that just staring through a piece of glass at a sword, however educational and interesting, is just not as fun as picking it up and giving it a hack-worthy swing. The museum wanted people to experience how historical weapons truly felt. So they decided to build one that visitors could lay their hands on.

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Many swords evolved from the Roman spatha – some would eventually morph into what we think of as the Viking sword. The swords were developed and forged during a long period of migration across Europe. Many of these were lost to time, of course, but others were found or recovered and made their way to many modern museums for us to see. However, because so many of them are in such weathered and fragile shape, visitors are not allowed to touch, feel, or hold the swords.

It was for this reason that the National Museum of Art in Norway contacted a school teacher and game developer- Nils Anderssen- to create a replica of one of their swords that visitors could touch.

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The sword that was chosen was funnily enough a replica itself. It was made for pro-Nazi Minister President Vidkun Quisling in 1942. A golden-hilted ring-sword, the original was most likely used only by kings and nobles, and was believed to be a symbol of oath. The goal was to make a sword that not only looked just like the one they had in possession, but also weigh as much, be just as detailed, and feel the same.

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Although the school teacher contacted by this museum was no blacksmith, he was very familiar with 3D printing.

Says Anderssen,

“In 3D Studio Max I have good control over the thickness and size of the patterns and therefore avoided problems in printing. Also, there are lot of sharp edges that are easy to do in 3D Studio Max.”

The sword was printed in bronze, while the hilt had details and pieces, “…gilded and fitted with wooden inserts for stability before being attached to the blade.”

Read more here on Popular Mechanics or here on 3dPrint.com.

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