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Rear Aperture Pistol Sights from Corps Tech Group

Corps Tech Group (a Veteran Owned Small Business) is revisiting the “peep sight vs. notch sight” debate with their RAPS Rear Aperture Sight Pistol. You may have also heard this sort of sight referred to as a ghost ring. I spoke with White Raven Communications at AUSA and they provided a sample to shoot with. I’ll be putting that on the range in the hands of at least four shooters of widely disparate abilities, but for now I just wanted to make you aware it is out there and available.

For those who are unfamiliar with the concept, a sight like the RAPS is intended to remove the problems associated with sight alignment (and, to a lesser extent in my mind, sight picture). Some believe they provide an intuitive (and therefore faster) target acquisition particularly under stress and in conditions of low light. Proponents liken it to an AR15 style sight vs. an AK style sight, citing a number of advantages (including the eye constraint a ring provides). However I say some believe because for every proponent of a RAPS-style sight there is a detractor.

Rear Aperture Pistol Sights from Corps Tech Group photo

Accuracy degradation is one of these reasons. Such sight will not (for most people) provide consistent accuracy at any significant range (even in the context of typical handgun ranges). This is largely because of the distance between the front and rear sights and the size of the rear aperture. That said, even critics find it difficult to dispute the advantages of a RAPS style sight for close range engagement (10 to 15 meters).

I have not personally used anything like the RAPS. That’s because I’ve never professionally been in a situation where round accountability and the ability to make precise shots from contact range to 50 yards and beyond wasn’t required – the key word there being professionally. Unless I’m missing something, this sort of sight is actually intended for shooters who do not already have a great deal of proficiency, most likely in a home defense situation (think a spouse or child who knows the basics but no more). Now, the argument could be made that everyone should be trained to proficiency if there is the slightest possibility they will be doing work with a weapon, but the simple fact is, that’s not always going to happen (or even be possible).

Rear Aperture Pistol Sights from Corps Tech Group photo

If you have some experience with the RAPS or something like it, feel free to weigh in.

Buy your RAPS or learn more here.