The Ultimate Firearms Destination for the Gun Lifestyle

Adam Webber of HK Parts Convicted

It all started at a local Dallas pawnshop more than a decade ago. On the shelf was an HK53, a very short 5.56 rifle. Had it been registered with the NFA, this story may end here. The ATF seized the SBR in June of 2005. Tracking down the source of the rifle, the ATF eventually ended up on the doorsteps of Adam and Benjamin Webber.

As is often the case with law enforcement investigations, officers will start unraveling one case that turns into another. Just a couple months after that first pawn shop seizure in June, the ATF yolked up several machineguns and suppressors from the Webbers, alleging that they were purchased for resale. They took custody of multiple Fleming Hk autosears, a number of automatic MAC-10’s, and some suppressors and magazines. Eventually in 2007 the Department of Justice came to a civil settlement with the them. Per the conditions of the settlement, Adam and Benjamin would be allowed to consign the Fleming sears to a third party FFL for sale, and would renounce the rights to all other assets seized. Additionally they agreed to never apply for or act as an FFL, or even be what’s called a “Responsible Party” for an FFL. The stipulated settlement did specifically state that the manufacture and sale of gun parts and components was authorized.
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Shortly thereafter, Adam Webber started HK Parts, which you may know as hkparts.net as a sole proprietorship. He started out small and later grew to have several employees. In 2009 Webber officially incorporated in the state of Utah and became HK Parts Inc.

Hk guns and items are highly revered in this country, likely due to a combination of performance, relative scarcity, and the Rainbow Six series of videogames. Strict German exportation policies had kept genuine HK parts in scant supply aside from a select few items. Previous attempts at American manufacturing by others didn’t help, as there were many negative reports about quality, craftsmanship, and efficacy. Promising to change all that, and appearing to follow through, rapidly HK Parts became a ‘go to’ supplier for, you guessed it, parts for HKs and weapons themselves.

But all was not happy. Two years ago in August of 2014, a federal grand jury dropped an eight count indictment on Adam Webber. It alleged he was dealing in firearms without a license, smuggling goods out of the United States, and six counts of filing a false tax return. This indictment made a small blip on the screen in the gun community, mostly paid attention to by Hk enthusiasts.

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Hundreds of firearms were seized from his property. They were located in a residential safe, a fortified dedicated gun room, and a shipping container. More than 210 HK P7’s alone were confiscated, along with dozens of PTR-91 receivers and .22lr models of HK 416’s.

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In the TV shows and other popular media, cases are swift and decided within a 60 minute episode; the real world isn’t always quite as brisk. Another indictment came down, superseding the previous in March of 2015. A second superseding indictment dropped in June of 2015, this one with thirteen charges.
-One count of dealing in firearms without a license
-Four counts of smuggling goods outside the United States
-One count of giving a false statement to a licensed FFL
-One count of giving a false statement during purchase of firearms
-Six counts of filing a false tax return

The charges of giving a false statement to a licensed FFL and giving a false statement during purchase of firearms were dropped shortly before the trial began.

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Requests for court date postponements came from both sides of the aisle. In April of this year, right before the trial was supposed to begin, Adam Webber was granted an additional 150 day postponement. Until when? It started September 13th and finished September 23rd.

As already outlined, Adam Webber signed a settlement saying that he would not apply for or act as an RP for an FFL. HK Parts Inc, owned by Adam Webber did at least give the appearance of being involved in firearms sales. Firearms were listed on the webpage for purchase (even now, though currently everything is out of stock) and at least one independent contractor agreement with HK Parts Inc specified, “HK Parts is in the business of selling Heckler and Koch parts, accessories, and weapons system….”.

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In the end, even if HK Parts closes its doors, this won’t be the finish of Hk-type roller guns in this country. Machinery can be bought and more companies will produce items so long as there is a demand. Turkish imports, though they may be made on older Hk machines, are gaining in popularity. And most recently,  genuine Hk semi-auto subguns in the form of the SP89. HK items will still remain pricey, no doubt, but perhaps far less so in the near future.

He was convicted today, September 23rd. The United States Department of Justice had this to say:

A Salt Lake County, Utah man was convicted today by a federal jury of one count of dealing in firearms without a license and five counts of filing false tax returns, announced Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Caroline D. Ciraolo, head of the Justice Department’s Tax Division, and U.S. Attorney John W. Huber for the District of Utah.

“Individuals such as Mr. Webber, who view themselves above the law and engage in criminal conduct to line their own pockets with funds that belong to the U.S. Treasury, will be held to account for their crimes and face severe consequences, including prosecution and incarceration,” said Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Ciraolo. “The Tax Division thanks its colleagues in the District of Utah and other federal agencies for their continued efforts to ensure that everyone pays their fair share.”

Sentencing begins December 1st. He faces a minimum sentence of five years for dealing with firearms without a license and up to three years for each count of filing a false tax return.

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