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Leupold DeltaPoint Micro Takes on Micro Red Dots

The relationship between pistols and red dot sights has been a one-way game of give-and-take. Handguns undergo slide surgery or take on extra mass in mounts in order to accommodate Micro Red Dot Sights. All while the optics themselves have been slow to conform. The new Leupold DeltaPoint Micro breaks the cycle of one-way-accommodation by design. From the ground up, the DeltaPoint Micro brings much and asks little in return.

What was once edgy punk rock has gone mainstream as optics crept from the far corners of space-age-looking competition guns and single-purpose hunting pistols, to become a common feature in Every Day Carry. Even as almost every major pistol manufacturer moved to offer optics ready variants that only widened the symbolic gap between “team red-dot” and “team iron sights.”

The new DeltaPoint Micro, however, solves both relationship problems by bridging the gap between iron and dots, while distinctly aiming for those who are red dot curious, but aren't about to send their slide to the surgeon for milling.

DeltaPoint Micro Features

The Leupold DeltaPoint Micro defines itself on two key features: how it mounts to a handgun and multiple concurrent sights built baked right in. No permanent alteration is required and it adds minimal bulk; you probably won't be forced to buy a new holster. Each sight is model specific, with Non-MOS Glock or Smith & Wesson M&P options currently available.

DeltaPoint Micro rear

When Zeroed, the front sight post sits similar to a lower 1/3 co-witness placement similar to an AR-15.

The DeltaPoint Micro can be aimed in three different ways. There's the 3 MOA dot for precision, the tube body itself can act as a ghost ring, and there's a rudimentary rear sight that corresponds with a standard front sight. In the event that the dot stops working, you still have functional irons with no additional cost or alteration. No need for suppressor height sights to have backups.

The DeltaPoint Micro fully encloses its emitter, protecting it from moisture, dust, and lint. The one-piece aluminum construction of the housing features a protective coating and makes for a distinctly rugged sight. With shake-awake technology, the battery is expected to further extend the suggested 3.5 year run time on mid-level brightness. With day-time bright options for the dot, matched with Leupold's reputation for clear glass, the shooter's sight picture remains undistorted, in clarity and color.

Interestingly, all of the optics' vital electronics are stored in the rubbery-coated button/cap that hangs off the back. If anything were to go wrong, and one had to take advantage of Leupold's noteworthy warranty, they will most likely be able to keep the optic mounted and simply replace the cap. Eight brightness settings are available by pressing the button, and once installed, zeroed, and set for brightness, the optic doesn't need to be removed, even for battery replacement.

deltapoint micro

Ideal for smaller frame Glocks, the DeltaPoint Micro completely overcomes the issues other sights face when the body of the red dot housing is wider than common single-stack frames.

Evaluation

Taking a step away from the norm, is, in this case, a very good thing. Leupold is breaking from the familiar pattern of trying for a bigger window and reconsidering the place of a Red Dot to augment, not define a handgun. This latest offering is firm in its identity as a tool for defensive concealed carry. From the holster, the shooter will have to adjust their draw if they have made it a habit to ride their thumb over the back of slide. The battery compartment adds enough material to the rear of the firearm to print on a shirt if attention isn't paid to how and where one carries.

It took little time to familiarize with the optic, and “finding the dot” was distinctly easier than when first introduced to other slide-mounted MRDS's. Taking qualities from both red dot and iron sights, the Leupold DeltaPoint Micro felt familiar when drawing due to its height, while still granting the pinpoint precision of a dot. On the range, clearing a plate rack was easier, especially at distance, than with iron sights, but when pushing the limit while making larger transitions one could lose the dot easily. A bit of practice helps but not completely negates this challenge.

Leupold Deltapoint Micro shoot house

Although strange to say, the shoot house defined the optic as a mostly defensive asset. Since reacting to a threat is different than hunting for a target, the DeltaPoint Micro's smaller aperture only increased the feeling of tunnel vision. It's easy to be driven by the dot, not the other way around. However, in scenario-based training, where the tube of the sight could operate as a ghost ring in extreme circumstances as a very rudimentary aiming reference point, the dot lent to greater confidence in making shots at further distances. Hostage rescue type shots clearly highlighted the advantage of a small dot over a traditional front sight post.

A smaller window to look through is, however, a case of true give-and-take. Along with the added durability against the elements, the smaller aperture obscures what's around the target quite noticeably. The shooter is forced to consciously remember what is around the target, whether that be the next in a series, or additional threats. We've seen this challenge before, and isn't so much different than the SIG P365 SAS, with it's built in fiber optics.

Overall, the Leupold DeltaPoint Micro makes an excellent splash in the crowded family feud of Red Dot Sights and Pistols. Distinctly not trying to be just like the others, it fits a niche, and quite excellently. Offering the advantages of a Red Dot Sight, such as no longer having to break focus from the target to the front sight, the Deltapoint Micro retains all the training and practice most of us have with iron sights. A powerful addition, but for a specific purpose. If you're red-dot curious, here's a great way to get your feet wet.


More on Red Dot Sights and Optics




8 responses to “Leupold DeltaPoint Micro Takes on Micro Red Dots”

  1. SB says:

    “The relationship between pistols and red dot sights has been a one-way game of give-and-take. Handguns undergo slide surgery or take on extra mass in mounts in order to accommodate Micro Red Dot Sights. All while the optics themselves have been slow to conform. The new Leupold DeltaPoint Micro breaks the cycle of one-way-accommodation by design”

    A smaller window to look through is, however, a case of true give-and-take.

  2. Salvador Ruiz says:

    Where is the price? I can’t even find it on the Leupold website

  3. Philip Lemon says:

    On the Leopold site, type Delta Point Micro in Search and it comes up. $519.99 for the Glock or S&W M&P versions.

  4. GomeznSA says:

    This device is one of those ‘gee why didn’t I think of that’ ideas that many of us have had rattling around in our heads for years.
    I’m with Salvador, what is the cost?

    BTW, the article did not mention that one of the primary reasons to shoot with both eyes open is to aid in situational awareness, just saying. YMMV.

  5. Brian Hays says:

    Will this fit a glock 43?
    Is it legal.
    Is the dot a projector dot or only in the scope. Or is it a laser?

  6. Tom Moyle says:

    This is not a laser sight. Rather a ‘reflex’ style where only the operator sees the red dot. Yes, this sight will work perfectly on a single stack G43 or other narrow framed pistols.

    Also, keeping both eyes open aids in total situational awareness. With both eyes open, the sight will almost disappear being able to just overlay the red dot on your target.

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